Questions For Expats: Collaborative Post

Monday, June 6, 2016



Today I'm excited to be bringing together a bunch of expat bloggers to share their feelings on their adopted homes. Below you'll find quick answers from six bloggers living in cool destinations all over the world.

I asked bloggers two different questions to get a feel for what's great and what's challenging about where they currently live. It was really interesting to read everyone's responses and was actually quite difficult for me to think of responses for my own contribution.

What is the best thing about your expat home?


NaNa (Foreign Geek) Living in Australia, from Indonesia; connect on Twitter

Okay, this might sound a little cheesy but I love almost everything about Melbourne, but if have to pick the best thing about being an expat here, it’s to experience diverse lifestyles with its own quirkiness that bound everyone together. Another thing is that there is always something interesting going on here in Melbourne all the time which richen my life experience. Like in the past two months living here, I have run a marathon, attended tea leaf reading party, watched footie game, and went to tea, beer and chocolate festivals.

Amanda (Rhyme and Ribbons) Living in London, from the US; connect on Twitter

The best thing about my expat home is all the rich history that England has that I'm lucky enough to get to explore.

Bailie (Brightly Bailie) Living in Sweden, from the US; connect on Twitter

The best part of living in Sweden for me is how it has made me love nature and get more healthy! In our previous apartment we were so lucky to have a almost panoramic view of forest from our living room and kitchen which I could watch throughout the seasons. It was so peaceful and also the great views encouraged me to get out and go hiking!

Cynthia (Adventurings) Living in the Czech Republic, from the US; connect on Twitter

Living in the heart of beautiful and historical Central Europe, a stone's throw away from several places of interest, life is good in a city that is large enough to have opportunities and fun things going on but small enough to feel incredibly laid-back and relaxed. A good combination!

Anna (Absolutely Anna) Living in Germany, from the US; connect on Twitter

It's so nice to experience a totally different lifestyle and culture. I find it so interesting to learn about the history, food and way of life in Germany. Where I live in Bonn has such a rich history dating back to the Roman times.

Van (Snow in Tromso) Living in Norway, from Germany; connect on Twitter

The best thing about my expat home in Northern Norway is definitely the stunning landscape around. From fjords, the ocean and beaches to mountains and forests - we have everything! I love that everything is close by too. I can see the ocean and mountains from my flat and am in the middle of the forest after a 2 minute and at the beach after a 10 minute walk. I don't think there's a place in my native Germany that is as awesome as Northern Norway!  
Me (In Search Of) Living in Lithuania, from the US; connect on Twitter

The best parts of living in Lithuania are the friends I've made here, the affordability of life, and the child (and mother) friendliness.


What's the most challenging thing about your expat home?

 NaNa (Foreign Geek) Living in Australia, from Indonesia; connect on Twitter

And the most challenging thing about being a new expat in Melbourne is the wet windy winter. It’s my first time living in a subtropical country and let me tell you, I wasn’t prepared for the weather. Every time people say “winter is coming” I am like isn’t this freaking winter already?!!


 Cynthia (Adventurings) Living in the Czech Republic, from the US; connect on Twitter

The language barrier in this region, even though it's slowly breaking down for me, is still strong as it stands in the way of doing some things: pursuing hobbies, meeting certain people, and generally getting involved in the real cultural life here.

Amanda (Rhyme and Ribbons) Living in London, from the US; connect on Twitter

The most challenging thing is just physically being away from my family and friends. Thank goodness for Skype but it's not the same thing.

Bailie (Brightly Bailie) Living in Sweden, from the US; connect on Twitter

The most challenging part of living in Sweden for me has been the more closed off nature that Swedes have. When in a store I am used to small talk and the wish of a good day or a nod and smile with your neighbors. However in Sweden you do not interact with neighbors unless absolutely necessary and if you smile at a stranger they will turn their head or give you a big side eye! I have adapted for the most part but I am known to get quite garrulous after a few drinks and startling a bartender!

 Anna (Absolutely Anna) Living in Germany, from the US; connect on Twitter

I think the most challenging thing is the language barrier. Even though I can speak enough German to get by here, I still feel like I struggle getting my thoughts out! There are days when ordering a coffee seems like climbing a mountain!

Van (Snow in Tromso) Living in Norway, from Germany; connect on Twitter

The most challenging thing about living in Tromso is its remoteness. You can't just go on a weekend or shopping trip like you can in the rest of Europe. Wherever you want to go, you have to go to Oslo, Stockholm or London Gatewick first, which makes travelling internationally a bit more difficult and expensive.

Me (In Search Of) Living in Lithuania, from the US; connect on Twitter

The most difficult things about living in Lithuania are the limited options for academic/research jobs for myself. When moving here, I had envisioned collaborating on research with academics and perhaps even taking on my own Master's students. This was just a lot more difficult than I imagined.



Thank you all for participating!



Please let me know in the comments if you like collaborative posts and would like to see these featured regularly on the blog. 

Are you an expat? How do you feel about your adopted home? Share in the comments below!

12 comments:

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    1. Of course! It was great to read everyone's responses!

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  2. What a wonderful post! I am so glad others mentioned the language challenge as it is huge for me and I often put such a burden on myself about it and imagine all other expats going about talking and feeling at ease.

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    1. Thank you so much for participating, Bailie! The language barrier can be a real challenge. I'm lucky here that many people speak English.

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  3. Thanks for featuring me as well, Elizabeth! I agree with Bailie - so many people think that after over 3 years in this country I'd be fluent which is far from the case, I'm afraid. But I'm happy we can talk about it too :)

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    1. Thank you for joining the post! It is very difficult to learn new languages and when you don't use it every day it is so hard to learn. Even if you do use it every day it can be difficult.

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  4. So much I could relate to. Great post!

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    1. I'm so glad you could relate! Is there anything you'd like to add?

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  5. Thanks for having me! So interesting to read about other people's challenges - definitely a lot to relate too! And even though I'm almost fluent in Norwegian, there are still situations where I don't understand something or others don't understand me so I think the language issue never really goes away completely...

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    1. Good point! My Chinese was pretty decent when I was living there, but sometimes people wouldn't expect Chinese to come out of my mouth so they wouldn't listen to what I'd say. Then they'd be shocked when they actually did start listening.

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  6. So fun reading everyone's answers!

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    1. I totally agree. Everyone has kind of similar challenges no matter where they live or where they are originally from. Certainly a lot we can all relate to!

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